Psychological Assessment Report for B.D.

by Kristen FescoeOctober 10, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychological Assessment Report for B.D.
 

Assessment

Completed

By

Kristen L. Fescoe, M.S.

 

October, 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

Reason for Referral.................................................................................................................... 3

 

Assessment Questions................................................................................................................ 3

 

Significant Findings ............................................................................................................... 3-4

   

Recommendations ................................................................................................................. 4-6

                              

..... Patent.................................................................................................................................. 4

 

..... GD................................................................................................................................... 4-5

              

Suggestions for dealing more effectively with B.D.

       ........................................................................................................................................... 5

      

..... Suggestions for communicating with an ENFP personality............................................ 5-6

 

Meyers Briggs Type Indicator ............................................................................................... 6-7

 

Relevant History.................................................................................................................... 7-8

   

   Relevant Characteristics......................................................................................................... 8-9

 

   Impressions of B.D............................................................................................................... 9-10

 

Procedures .............................................................................................................................. 10

 

 

   ....................................................................................................................................................

   

   

            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Psychological Profile

 

September 27, 2004

Re: B.D.

 

Referral

A request for a psychological profile of B.D. of DW was made by Company X to provide information relevant to increasing the success of future interactions with Mr. D.

 

Assessment Questions

  1. What are the relevant characteristics of B.D.?
  2. How can Company X deal with Mr. D most effectively?
  3. How can Company X influence Mr. D to move forward in the project while allowing them to take an active role?
     

Significant Findings

  1. B.D. has displayed a high level of controlling and an unwillingness to allow Company X to be directly involved in the furtherance of current projects.
  2. Mr. D has exhibited uncharacteristic behavior in regards to GD. B interacts with his peers in a patterned manner, yet his interactions with Mr. D have appeared very contrary. This may stem from one of two reasons: 1) GD may still have possession of the patent or 2) he may feel that if he loses Mr. D he will thereby lose all knowledge he has of the technical aspect of the current project.  
  3. Although it is impossible to do more than speculate, the information provided regarding GD establishes a high probability of mental disturbance. He has reported or displayed the following pathological behavior: Paranoid delusions, false claims of changing laser components and wavelengths, other claims of false technological advances, a recent separation from his wife, regular use of potent pain medications and other erratic behavior. These behaviors may be indicative of a psychotic disorder such as Schizophrenia. It is recommended that he be assessed by a mental health professional for further evaluation. 
  4. B’s inability to delegate and share control of his project may stem from an authority complex evidenced by his rebellious youth and his pride in disobeying his commanding officers in the military. Also relevant to his level of controlling is the drive to please his father, and prove his worth to his family.
  5. Mr. D’s view of himself as a Southern Gentleman is extremely important to bear in mind while interacting with him. He believes that people in society are each born into a role and they are then required to act within this role.  He will hold certain expectations of the people he deals with professionally and will expect to be treated according to his role.

 

Recommendations

Patent

It is this assessor’s opinion that it may be necessary to ask B outright who holds the patent. This will be crucially important in deciding how to move forward in dealing with both Mr. D and Mr. D.  This should be done in a cautious manner, as his reaction will be unknown. It should be done by the person at Company X B feels most comfortable with.

 

GD

Because Mr. D has exhibited a high level of pathological behavior it is important to bring this to the attention of B. Of concern are his paranoid delusions, recent separation from his wife (displaying a progression of his instability), regular use of potent pain medications and grandiose claims of technological feats he asserts he has discovered. These disturbances will likely become greater and greater as time passes.

 

This disclosure to B should be done by appealing to him in a personal manner (as this has been effective in the past). Rather than pointing out the fact that Mr. D has told fabrications relevant to this project, it should be an alert from Company X regarding their growing concern for G personally. The hope will be that B will not only become aware of G’s mental status, but will also re-evaluate Mr. D’s role in this project. Should B already be aware of G’s mounting mental health situation it could potentially open a door for a discussion on what positions B and G currently possess relative to the patent and this project.

 

It would be helpful if the person informing Mr. D be the person with the greatest interaction with G. This person will have the ability to attest to his increasing disturbance as well as exhibit a level of personal concern for G.

 

Suggestions for dealing more effectively with B.D.

  • When offering suggestions to B, offer many options so he can choose from the variety of choices and maintain a sense of control over the decisions.
  • Once a decision is made by B, Company X needs to put a plan into action immediately. The best way to get B moving on a plan is to get him excited about it. First, openly convey a significant interest and exhilaration about the decision, and then suggest that you get moving on the idea immediately because it is an innovative idea requiring immediate attention. This will convey a sense of enthusiasm, rather than a sense of pressure. 
  • Approach this project as achieving a mutual goal by way of experimentation and journey. If B sees this project as a journey rather than a project, he may be more receptive to Company X’s ideas.
  • When having brainstorming sessions, the ideas B will likely respond to are generally going to be more abstract and innovative.
  • When presenting information, it is essential to point out all the benefits to Mr. D. He must always feel that he is getting more than he is giving.

 

Suggestions for communicating with an ENFP personality

  • Focus on interesting and innovative possibilities and new ways of solving problems
  • Be friendly, and straightforward
  • Emphasize how to help others in practical ways
  • Take action! Respond immediately to requests
  • Appeal to his common sense
  • Don’t overwhelm him with facts and details
  • Keep things relaxed, warm and flexible
  • Appreciate his creativity, curiosity and uniqueness
  • Assure him how important he is
  • Re-establish harmony quickly
  • Try not too force decisions to quickly
  • He prefers dealing with possibilities, particularly for people and makes decisions on the basis of personal values
  • His life is flexible, following new insights and possibilities as they arise
  • He is creative and insightful, often seeking to try new ideas that can be of benefit to people
  • He may sometimes neglect details and planning, but he enjoys work that involves experimentation and variety, working towards a general goal
  • He operates best in practical situations involving people
     

Meyers Briggs Type Indicator

The MBTI or Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, developed in 1943 was used for assessment of the subject’s personality type. This test measures four bipolar factors, Introversion/Extroversion, Thinking/Feeling, Intuition/Sensing, and Judging/Perceiving. This personality assessment tool is a written instrument that "indicates" a person's likely psychological type.

 

The interviewed participants provided information relevant to the four factors and this information was evaluated according to the MBTI. B is primarily an ENFP (Extravert, Intuitive, Feeler, Perceiver) and secondarily as ESFP (Extravert, Sensor, Feeler, Perceiver). People of this type tend to be: warm, Garious and playful, impulsive, curious and talkative, enthusiastic, outgoing; clever, curious, and playful; social and unpredictable with a great zeal for life, caring, sensitive, optimistic, adaptable, resourceful but sometimes disorganized.

 

The most important thing to ENFP’s is freedom to see possibilities, be spontaneous, have fun, make connections, and enjoy the company of others.

 

Relevant History

B.D. is a Caucasian male in his early 60’s. He and his second wife, Kay D, have been married for approximately 20-25 years and have five children (all from their first marriages). One of Mr. D’s sons exhibits some cognitive impairment, although the etiology is unknown.

 

B has shared a great many stories related to his “rebellious youth”. He shares stories of spending money, behaving wildly even outrunning police officers. Although he was proud of his rebellion, he was also reportedly consumed by the drive to please his father (who is deceased).  He graduated from a southern university with a Bachelors degree. He also spent 4-6 years in the Army Tank Corp., working his way to the rank of Lieutenant. It was reported that many of the men in his family served in the army, which is why he joined the armed services. He served during the Vietnam era and was at some point stationed in Germany. He reports being proud of the fact that he repeatedly “got away with” often defying his commanding officers.

 

Mr. D resides in City L, GA which is located approximately 60 miles southwest of Atlanta with a population of 25,998. He and his wife live in a modest home in a modest neighborhood. They view themselves as well-established in the community, B holding a seat on the local bank board and Mrs. D having held a seat in the City L Council. He appears to be well known and respected within his community and is most often addressed as ‘Mr. D’ by the people in this community.

 

Mr. D presents himself as a proud “Southern Gentleman.” It is reported that he holds racist views, most likely due to this mentality. Although he holds racist views, it is reported that he is still polite to all people he directly interacts with. 

 

D W employs 110 people, giving them the rank of the 20th largest employer in Lagrange.

 

Relevant Characteristics

B.D. is a generally positive person who, participants’ say, views himself as a ‘Benevolent Father’, a ‘Benevolent Dictator’ and a ‘Southern Gentleman’. He is a social person, but also behaves guarded in certain circumstances. Mr. D’s decision making skills are reported as being forthright. Interviews held that he is quick to make decisions and will follow through with these decisions regardless of new information. When asked about Mr. D’s creativity and innovation, participants gave mixed responses. The majority felt that B is not particularly innovative or creative. It appears that B believes himself to be innovative, yet his behavior is not indicative of a high level of creativity. This is evidenced by his inability to move this project forward and his inability to deal effectively with GD. He has shown ineffective Conflict – Management Skills also through his unproductive management of GD. B believes himself to be an organized person and may present this way originally, but his behaviors are not indicative of an organized person. This can be seen through his lack of planning in regards to this project.

 

Mr. D’s communication style has been described as both forceful and instructional. He has the ability to change his demeanor very quickly when communicating. This relates to his level of self-control. Participants report facial expressions and an impulsive stroking of his hair when under great stress. They also state that B appears very strained in some negotiations and discussions but he appears to use a great deal of impulse control to keep his composure.

 

B.D. presents a very high level of controlling, almost to the point of neuroses. His need for unmitigated control is evidenced by the screening of all D W employee e-mails, monitoring phone calls of his employees, apparent fear of Mr. D by his employees, and his lack of allowing Company X to aid in the furtherance of this project.

 

Also notable are Mr. D’s professional relationships.  Participants report B’s preference to deal directly with his peers rather than those he views as his subordinates.  It was also noted that B does have some enemies and does not have a fear of making enemies.

 

Impressions of B.D.

In relation to Mr. D’s level of trustworthiness and truthfulness, mixed responses were given by participants. B has reportedly stated that he ‘never tells a lie’ yet there is evidence to the contrary. A discussion was held between Company X and D W in respect to a potential partnership, yet B later denied the occurrence of this discussion. It appears that B is most likely to lie by omission, but evidence shows that his truthfulness is not complete.

 

Mr. D’s reported strengths are his decisiveness, his ability to maintain composure, his ability to “stone-wall” in difficult negotiations and his capacity to be directional. His weaknesses are noted as his inability to listen to suggestions or comments, his autocratic style, his lack of organization, his failure to delegate appropriately, his high level of controlling and the fact that his employees exhibit fear for him.

 

Participants reported several things that have proven effective when dealing with B in the past.

  • Agreeing with him
  • Making him feel well liked and respected
  • “Buttering him up”
  • Showing him a personal side
  • Making a personal connection
  • Appealing to that personal connection
  • Making him feel like a king
     

 

 

Procedures

  • 9/26 – 9/29 - Evaluation of current literature for relevant information regarding conducting this specific psychological assessment for practical business application.
     
  • 9/30 - Create set of Evaluative Questions
  • 9/30 - Development of Interview Tools
  • 10/5 - Personal Interview with G.S., Sales Director of Company X
  • 10/6 - Telephone Interview with G.A., South Eastern Regional Sales Manager of Company X
     
  • 10/7 - Telephone Interview with B.M., Managing Director of Company X
     
  • Subjective Completion of Meyers Briggs Type Indicator Personality Test
     
  • 10/8 – 10/12 - Data Interpretation and Report Writing

 

 

Thank you for the opportunity to evaluate B.D.

Kristen L. Fescoe, M.S.

Psychological Assessor